Crafting Progress

My husband’s new linen tunic is mostly sewn! I’ve been sewing by hand and using “free” linen thread again, so I have to keep pausing to spin more whenever I run out.

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The band for the collar, cuffs, and hem is coming along nicely after a big hiccup during warping. I’m more than halfway through, although I’ll probably need to warp up another shorter piece after this one.

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On the writing side of things, I’ve got an idea for a new novel that’s very different from my usual fare, but I’m going to be good and stick with Featherfolk for now. Maybe I’ll go for it during NaNoWriMo or condense the idea into an entry for next year’s Mormon Lit Blitz. Or both!

We’ll see.

Happy Yarning.

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Book Report: Woven by Michael Jensen and David Powers King

wpid-wp-1436475450142.jpgRarely do my passions for string crafts and fantasy collide as “seamlessly” as in Woven.

This was a fun read, and it felt fresh and original despite its rather run-of-the-mill pseudo-medieval setting. (I didn’t read the back of the book beforehand, so I was surprised when the main character died a couple chapters in. He is loads of fun as a ghost!) I particularly enjoyed the magic system, as it is based on sewing and weaving.

My niece read the first half of the book to me while we drove back and forth to WIFYR, and I liked it so much that I bought a copy after I got back to Washington. I will be sure to watch for other books by these authors.

I recommend Woven for teens and up, particularly those of a crafty persuasion.

Happy Yarning!

Continuous Warping: The Best Invention Since Ever

Continuous Warping: The Best Invention Since Ever

I did not understand continuous warping until I bought an inkle loom last summer. My first tablet weaving projects were tensioned using my foot or a doorknob or this cheap little loom I made.

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Without a warping board, it was a pain to try cutting all the warp threads to the same length. Continuous warping takes care of length, and the inkle loom is easy to tension.

When I first got my inkle loom, I wasn’t sure how to warp any tablet weave projects continuously besides double-face ones. (And I was done with double-face for a while after my painstakingly crafted trees came out looking like vases or aliens in the weave above.)

But after six inkle projects, I was ready to tackle tablet weaving again.

Oh man. Continuous warping is AMAZING!

I’ll have to do a tutorial sometime on the method I figured out for warping threaded-in tablet weave patterns on an inkle loom. For now, this is just a Public Service Announcement because (have I mentioned?) continuous warping is wonderful.

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The pattern I’m weaving now is one of Guntram’s simple patterns. Guntram’s Tabletweaving Thingy is also on my list of awesome things.

 

The Dangers of Texting and Weaving

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<satire>

Much has been said on the dangers of texting and driving. Texting-related auto accidents are a concern nationwide. However, little to no notice has been taken of the threat texting poses to weaving.

Each time you pick up your phone to read or send a text while weaving, you risk disaster. One erroneous pass of the weft can set in motion a chain of errors, leading to hours, even days of unweaving.

With the noted rise in texting since 2008, the amount of time spent unweaving due to texting-related errors has increased exponentially. This brings the hours of time spent unweaving to an average of twelve hours a day nationwide.

It is never safe to text and weave at the same time. Keep yourself, your family, and your nation protected by waiting until you leave the loom to send your texts.

</satire>