The Weaving Bug

It must be that time of year. I caught the weaving bug.

I’m planning out an Anglo-Saxon undertunic for my husband, and I decided it’s time to do this right. I’m going to tablet weave some simple trim for the hems.

I haven’t done any serious tablet weaving since college, so I needed to refresh my skills and reacquaint myself with the glorious freeware program called Guntram’s Tabletweaving Thingy.

I’ve given a plug for GTT before, but seriously, this Guntram guy is an angel. With GTT, I save so much time and yarn and frustration by trying out different threading patterns and colors and weaving sequences before I warp anything.

For example, the bands below are a few of the possible designs I could weave with the exact same threaded tablets.

possible AS tabletweaving patterns

I prototyped each one virtually so my husband could pick out his favorite. (In case you’re wondering, he chose the center one.)

Now I’m ready to warp up.

Happy Weaving!

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Completed Endless Knots Inkle Belt

Since my sister was in town, I put in the last few hours to finish up my sixth inkle project, the Celtic belt she commissioned in navy, white, and gold.

Here it is with the D-rings already attached, ready to be cut to the final length and finished.

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I derived this endless knots design from the Celtic pickup pattern on norsegirl.com.

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I’ve certainly improved at keeping the width and tension constant throughout, compared to my first project eight months ago, which had this same design in different colors.

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I think whatever I weave next will use medium weight yarn for the warp and weft. Think how quickly that will weave up compared to #10 crochet cotton!

Happy Yarning.

 

 

Prototype for the Next Baby Blanket

I’m itching to start knitting a new baby blanket. This may or may not have something to do with Camp NaNoWriMo taking precedence above all other creative endeavors this month.

When the crafting itch got bad a few days ago, I snuck out of Scrivener and opened a web browser. I looked around until I spied a neat pattern with alternating knit and purl sections resulting in an almost twill texture, and I thought, I can handle knitting and purling. But I want it to look even more like a twill weave than that.

So after some time in MS Paint and trying things out with the nearest needles and yarn to hand, I developed this pattern:

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Ta da! Twill weave texture.

Here’s how I did it. Well, actually, here’s a diagram of a slightly more developed version of the above.

Twill knit

Dark = knit; light = purl–on the front. (The reverse side is inverted, also backwards.)

Now imagine this repeated across a baby blanket in super soft, light green yarn!

Drool.

I’ve decided I can’t even pick out the yarn until after April, lest I irrevocably sabotage my word count. ‘Till then, I’m sticking to a strict diet of griffins and magic.

Happy Yarning!

Yarning

Works in progress from my yarning hobbies.

Stripes and checkers baby blanket

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Knit, acrylic, about 60% done. Everyone in the Young Women’s program at church knows I knit because I keep toting this along to activities.

Update: See the finished blanket in a later post. Completed Stripes and Checkers Baby Blanket

Inkle Project #6

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It’s a belt commissioned by my sister. #10 crochet cotton, inkle-woven, with a celtic pickup pattern I derived from the one on norsegirl.com. Incidentally, you too can learn to inkle weave from her website.

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Update: See the finished belt in a later post. Completed Endless Knots Inkle Belt

Green afghan

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Tunisian crochet, wool, just begun. I fell in love with the texture of this variation of Tunisian crochet. It makes a very fluid fabric. Plus, my mother-in-law gifted me a bunch of great green wool.

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And…the Infamous Tree Blanket

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Tapestry crochet, acrylic.

I’ve worked on this sucker on and off since high school. Still only about 70% done. I’m not all that eager to finish, because it just doesn’t look as nice as I hoped. There isn’t enough contrast between the dark colors and the black background, and all those strings I carry along peek out everywhere.

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Still, it forced me to learn to crochet left-handed (to maintain a front and back), so it’s not a total waste?

When the mood strikes me, I also spin.

The project I’m proudest of was a knitted alpaca hat for my dad, with wool from his own alpaca.

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Can you spot the hat? Knitting it was only a small part of this project.

What yarn crafts do you like to do?