Ripping Out

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I learned to crochet first. When I began knitting, I didn’t know I could use a crochet hook to fix mistakes several rows back. I thought that a purl, which should have been a knit, would remain forever a mistake, unless I was brave enough to try ripping out the last few rows (and by some miracle get all the loops back on the needle). I thought fixing mistakes in crocheting was easier, because after you rip back to the error, you have only one loop to pick up to start again.

Now I know better.

As I ripped out line after line of Tunisian crochet back to the place where I went from 24 to 23 stitches per row, I wished I was knitting.

Sometimes editing is like knitting. Sometimes there are things that can be fixed without taking a whole scene or a whole chapter apart.

Sometimes, editing is like crocheting. Rip out and redo.

I ripped Featherfolk down to the base chain when I started draft II.

Ah well, back to work.

Happy Yarning!

Tunisian Crochet Tutorial

Due to the popularity of my post on Tunisian crochet last month, I’d like to revisit the craft in more detail.

Tunisian crochet can be done with any type of crochet hook. Of course, ordinary crochet hooks limit the width of your project (though there are some neat spiral patterns that can make up for that).

To do Tunisian crochet, think of a single crochet stitch as a series of steps:

1. Insert hook through loop on previous row.

2. Yarn over.

3. Pull up loop.

4. Yarn over.

5. Pull through both loops on hook.

But instead of doing them in that order, you’ll do 1-3 for an entire row before going back along with steps 4 and 5.

Here’s what I mean. Start with a base chain of any length (I would recommend no more than ten or fifteen chains long if you have an ordinary hook.)

Pull up a loop in the first chain as if you were going to do a single crochet stitch.

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Then pull up a loop in the next chain, keeping all other loops on your hook.

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Repeat this step along to the end of the row.

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Yarn over and pull through ONE loop*. (If you do not do this at the end of every row, your project will get narrower and narrower.)

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Yarn over and pull through two loops.

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Continue to yarn over and pull through two loops until you are back where you started and only one loop remains on the hook.

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Start a new row, pulling up a loop through each vertical loop in the row below.

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Make as many rows as you like.

For some variation, try pulling in a new color at the * step.

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Using the second color, work back along the row and then start a new one. Change colors again when you reach the * step again. I’ve tried this with up to three colors to nice effect.

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Once you’ve mastered this basic Tunisian crochet stitch, there are many variations to play with–like the one that turns out looking almost identical to knit stockinette stitch.

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Tutorials for the variations can be found all over the internet. (For example, at this site: My Tunisian Crochet.)

Happy Yarning!

Completed Tunisian Potholders

Yes, indeed, I have finished the Tunisian crochet potholders (highlighted in a previous post) in time for church tomorrow.

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They wanted to model in the kitchen:

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Ain’t nothing going to burn you through these.

Happy Yarning!

 

Yarning

Works in progress from my yarning hobbies.

Stripes and checkers baby blanket

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Knit, acrylic, about 60% done. Everyone in the Young Women’s program at church knows I knit because I keep toting this along to activities.

Update: See the finished blanket in a later post. Completed Stripes and Checkers Baby Blanket

Inkle Project #6

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It’s a belt commissioned by my sister. #10 crochet cotton, inkle-woven, with a celtic pickup pattern I derived from the one on norsegirl.com. Incidentally, you too can learn to inkle weave from her website.

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Update: See the finished belt in a later post. Completed Endless Knots Inkle Belt

Green afghan

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Tunisian crochet, wool, just begun. I fell in love with the texture of this variation of Tunisian crochet. It makes a very fluid fabric. Plus, my mother-in-law gifted me a bunch of great green wool.

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And…the Infamous Tree Blanket

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Tapestry crochet, acrylic.

I’ve worked on this sucker on and off since high school. Still only about 70% done. I’m not all that eager to finish, because it just doesn’t look as nice as I hoped. There isn’t enough contrast between the dark colors and the black background, and all those strings I carry along peek out everywhere.

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Still, it forced me to learn to crochet left-handed (to maintain a front and back), so it’s not a total waste?

When the mood strikes me, I also spin.

The project I’m proudest of was a knitted alpaca hat for my dad, with wool from his own alpaca.

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Can you spot the hat? Knitting it was only a small part of this project.

What yarn crafts do you like to do?