Adventures with Linen: Simple Wimple

Good Christian women cover their heads. Or at least they did in Europe for a lot of the Medieval period. Headgear is the first part of medieval garb to be neglected by “noobs,” simply because it isn’t very important in modern western culture.

I am guilty of this–also guilty of wearing renaissance-esque snoods with early period dresses. But I’m learning.

For my new garb, I made a white linen wimple.

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After spending some hours on research and coming repeatedly across the answer that “We really don’t know how wimples worked, but they looked like this,” I settled on the “circle with a hole” design for my first wimple. I was inspired by this handy page tucked away on rosieandglenn.co.uk, which made it look simple enough for everyday wear. However, in my research I read that the headband or fillet was worn under (not over) the wimple, so I made that adjustment for myself.

Of course, in my haste, I broke one of my cardinal rules of garb-making. When cutting any hole for your head, always start too small and increase the size. Oops. But it still works despite its mammoth hole.

I spun my own thread (see my earlier post about that) to sew the hems. Perhaps with future wimples I’ll do something fancier than these little rolled hems.

And with a fillet made from a piece of my serpent tablet-weave belt (from yet another earlier post), I have a wimple!

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We’ll see how it does on its maiden voyage next weekend. I shan’t be surprised if it does go sailing off my head once or twice. All in the name of science–I mean, reenactment–of course.

Happy Yarning!

Yarning

Works in progress from my yarning hobbies.

Stripes and checkers baby blanket

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Knit, acrylic, about 60% done. Everyone in the Young Women’s program at church knows I knit because I keep toting this along to activities.

Update: See the finished blanket in a later post. Completed Stripes and Checkers Baby Blanket

Inkle Project #6

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It’s a belt commissioned by my sister. #10 crochet cotton, inkle-woven, with a celtic pickup pattern I derived from the one on norsegirl.com. Incidentally, you too can learn to inkle weave from her website.

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Update: See the finished belt in a later post. Completed Endless Knots Inkle Belt

Green afghan

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Tunisian crochet, wool, just begun. I fell in love with the texture of this variation of Tunisian crochet. It makes a very fluid fabric. Plus, my mother-in-law gifted me a bunch of great green wool.

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And…the Infamous Tree Blanket

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Tapestry crochet, acrylic.

I’ve worked on this sucker on and off since high school. Still only about 70% done. I’m not all that eager to finish, because it just doesn’t look as nice as I hoped. There isn’t enough contrast between the dark colors and the black background, and all those strings I carry along peek out everywhere.

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Still, it forced me to learn to crochet left-handed (to maintain a front and back), so it’s not a total waste?

When the mood strikes me, I also spin.

The project I’m proudest of was a knitted alpaca hat for my dad, with wool from his own alpaca.

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Can you spot the hat? Knitting it was only a small part of this project.

What yarn crafts do you like to do?