Sewing Fail

I had never tried to make clothing for children before. I assumed sewing a medieval dress for my baby would be like making a dress for an adult.

Not so.

Part way through sewing the pieces together, I discovered that I could not get the dress on her. Apparently, non-stretchy garments have to be quite a bit bigger than the baby they’re intended for.

After fiddling around with adding more panels to the dress, I finally ran out of time and gave up. Baby went to the faire in her mundane clothes.

Live and learn!

Happy Yarning.

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Amigurumi: Facial Experiments

I looked about for different ways to do eyes and settled on one I could do without going out to buy more things. I crocheted them out of #10 crochet cotton and sewed them on. I think this method has a lot of potential for different shapes and colors and styles, all resulting in flat, secure eyes safe for anyone to chew on.

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Then I looked at hair. I loved one tutorial using yarn fringe (link), but I wanted to try out the look of crocheted locks. So I made lines of locks and sewed them on in four layers, starting at the bottom and working up to the part on top.

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Her hair is beautiful, but rather heavy. It’s certainly not for the faint of neck.

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Her mouth is just a wee line of embroidery with #10 crochet cotton. I’m not sure about the shape and may try again.

Next: to figure out some clothes!

Happy Yarning.

Adventures with Linen: Simple Wimple

Good Christian women cover their heads. Or at least they did in Europe for a lot of the Medieval period. Headgear is the first part of medieval garb to be neglected by “noobs,” simply because it isn’t very important in modern western culture.

I am guilty of this–also guilty of wearing renaissance-esque snoods with early period dresses. But I’m learning.

For my new garb, I made a white linen wimple.

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After spending some hours on research and coming repeatedly across the answer that “We really don’t know how wimples worked, but they looked like this,” I settled on the “circle with a hole” design for my first wimple. I was inspired by this handy page tucked away on rosieandglenn.co.uk, which made it look simple enough for everyday wear. However, in my research I read that the headband or fillet was worn under (not over) the wimple, so I made that adjustment for myself.

Of course, in my haste, I broke one of my cardinal rules of garb-making. When cutting any hole for your head, always start too small and increase the size. Oops. But it still works despite its mammoth hole.

I spun my own thread (see my earlier post about that) to sew the hems. Perhaps with future wimples I’ll do something fancier than these little rolled hems.

And with a fillet made from a piece of my serpent tablet-weave belt (from yet another earlier post), I have a wimple!

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We’ll see how it does on its maiden voyage next weekend. I shan’t be surprised if it does go sailing off my head once or twice. All in the name of science–I mean, reenactment–of course.

Happy Yarning!

Adventures with Linen: Long Seams

Sewing dresses by hand is all good fun until you get to the long seams.

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For my Anglo-Saxon linen underdress, I’m sewing the pieces together with a running stitch and then oversewing the seam allowances to prevent fraying.

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The shoulders and sleeves and gussets all came together pretty fast, but now I’m in the middle of sewing in the gores. Those are the tall triangles at the sides, which basically turn the dress from a long tube into something you can wear.

I’ve been watching movies to pass the time while I work on the gore seams. Lately I’ve been on a Danny Kaye kick. I watched both The Court Jester and White Christmas this week.

What do you do to keep your brain from frying on the long, boring parts of projects?