Tunisian Baby Jacket

Look what I made!

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I don’t like sewing seams on crocheted projects. In making up the pattern for this jacket, I endeavored to leave as little sewing as possible. If I had a double-end crocheting hook in the correct size, I would even have tried to do the sleeves in the round. (P.S. Tunisian crochet in the round is fun stuff.)

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I saw pictures of this style of sweater online, and the first thing I did was go back and find the tutorial I encountered once for a Tunisian Ten Stitch Blanket. Makes total sense, right? No? Well, I wanted to learn how to join diagonals and sides as I crochet, and this teaches it all.

I worked each of the five sweater pieces (right front, right sleeve, back, left sleeve, and left front) from the neck down, joining to the previous pieces at the shoulders and sides as I went.

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And the decorative stitches are ones I learned from My Tunisian Crochet, an awesome blog I have highlighted before.

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I hope to work out the kinks in this pattern and write it all down, because I found it an attractive and relatively simple way to make a sweater.

Happy Yarning!

Tunisian Crochet Resource

I’m still working out what I want to do with a bunch of sweet green wool yarn I was gifted. Right now it’s going to be a Tunisian crochet afghan. (Click here for my tutorial on basic Tunisian crochet.)

Since I’m using only one color, I’m experimenting with lots of different textures. My main resource for the different stitches and patterns is this website: My Tunisian Crochet. Sadly, some of the links on the site are broken, but the information that is there is fantastic, especially the youtube videos of how to work different stitches. Head on over if you want to spice up your Tunisian crochet repertoire.

Here’s the afghan stripe on my hook right now. I love the texture!

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Happy Yarning.

Tunisian Crochet Tutorial

Due to the popularity of my post on Tunisian crochet last month, I’d like to revisit the craft in more detail.

Tunisian crochet can be done with any type of crochet hook. Of course, ordinary crochet hooks limit the width of your project (though there are some neat spiral patterns that can make up for that).

To do Tunisian crochet, think of a single crochet stitch as a series of steps:

1. Insert hook through loop on previous row.

2. Yarn over.

3. Pull up loop.

4. Yarn over.

5. Pull through both loops on hook.

But instead of doing them in that order, you’ll do 1-3 for an entire row before going back along with steps 4 and 5.

Here’s what I mean. Start with a base chain of any length (I would recommend no more than ten or fifteen chains long if you have an ordinary hook.)

Pull up a loop in the first chain as if you were going to do a single crochet stitch.

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Then pull up a loop in the next chain, keeping all other loops on your hook.

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Repeat this step along to the end of the row.

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Yarn over and pull through ONE loop*. (If you do not do this at the end of every row, your project will get narrower and narrower.)

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Yarn over and pull through two loops.

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Continue to yarn over and pull through two loops until you are back where you started and only one loop remains on the hook.

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Start a new row, pulling up a loop through each vertical loop in the row below.

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Make as many rows as you like.

For some variation, try pulling in a new color at the * step.

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Using the second color, work back along the row and then start a new one. Change colors again when you reach the * step again. I’ve tried this with up to three colors to nice effect.

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Once you’ve mastered this basic Tunisian crochet stitch, there are many variations to play with–like the one that turns out looking almost identical to knit stockinette stitch.

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Tutorials for the variations can be found all over the internet. (For example, at this site: My Tunisian Crochet.)

Happy Yarning!