Book Report: His Majesty’s Dragon by Naomi Novik

IMG_4475I loved this book. It’s set during the Napoleonic wars, and it reads like it was written then, down to the punctuation. The main character had all the sensibilities of an upper class man of his time. He felt like he walked off the pages of a navy captain’s journal.

And then there were dragons inserted seamlessly into the world.

I can’t recommend this too highly. It’s so far above something like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

My kind of “historical” fiction!

Happy Yarning.

Book Report: Sorcery & Cecelia or The Enchanted Chocolate Pot by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer

IMG_3493This was a fun read.

I enjoyed Wrede’s Enchanted Forest Chronicles as a child, and I was glad to find something else by her to sink my sweet tooth into. Sorcery & Cecelia reminded me at different points of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and any number of Diana Wynne Jones’s books. It combines reality/history with fantasy elements in interesting and entertaining ways.

The format is a collection of letters between two cousins, which is a bit jarring at first, but soon becomes smooth and easy to follow. The story was originally just a letter-writing game between the two authors, which gives me all kinds of fun ideas…

I recommend it for teens and adults, especially those who have enjoyed other regency novels (and especially girls as it is a Girl Power book).

Happy Yarning!

Book Report: A Conspiracy of Kings by Megan Whalen Turner

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I finally got around to reading Megan Whalen Turner’s fourth book set in the world of The Thief. As usual, I loved the characters. They’re intelligent, but sometimes their emotions get the better of them. They have quirks and backgrounds and plans, and it’s fun to see them grow and juggle the calls of leadership and personal goals.

The setting was as magical as ever.

I wish I’d read this right after The King of Attolia, since I’ve forgotten lots of little things that happened in the first three books. This one looks back on The Thief a lot, because those events were a defining time for Sophos.

My only gripe for this book would be the shifting voice and point of view. Large chunks of the text were in first person (Sophos telling his story, bam, no problems there). But there were also periods of third person limited, in which the POV switched between different characters. I found myself reading so fast that I missed these shifts, and it became a blur of third person semi-omniscient.

I definitely recommend this series to teen and adult fantasy readers.

And for anyone who left off the series after The King of Attolia (because Sophos didn’t look as interesting as Gen), read on! There’s plenty of Gen in A Conspiracy of Kings.  (Also, Sophos is awesome too.)