Tunisian Baby Jacket

Look what I made!

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I don’t like sewing seams on crocheted projects. In making up the pattern for this jacket, I endeavored to leave as little sewing as possible. If I had a double-end crocheting hook in the correct size, I would even have tried to do the sleeves in the round. (P.S. Tunisian crochet in the round is fun stuff.)

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I saw pictures of this style of sweater online, and the first thing I did was go back and find the tutorial I encountered once for a Tunisian Ten Stitch Blanket. Makes total sense, right? No? Well, I wanted to learn how to join diagonals and sides as I crochet, and this teaches it all.

I worked each of the five sweater pieces (right front, right sleeve, back, left sleeve, and left front) from the neck down, joining to the previous pieces at the shoulders and sides as I went.

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And the decorative stitches are ones I learned from My Tunisian Crochet, an awesome blog I have highlighted before.

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I hope to work out the kinks in this pattern and write it all down, because I found it an attractive and relatively simple way to make a sweater.

Happy Yarning!

Knit Newborn Hat

The nesting urge is real. Lately it’s got me replacing dead light bulbs around the apartment, putting up Halloween decorations, and knitting. Here’s the hat I made on Wednesday.

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I used light weight acrylic yarn and size 2 (I think) double-point needles. I made up the pattern with the help of these handy sizing measurements from Bev’s Country Cottage website.

It was very satisfying to finish a knitting project in one afternoon. I can’t wait to put this on a tiny little head!

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Happy Yarning.

Wimples for the Win

We had a blast despite the searing sun at the North Sound Sergeantry Trials and Sable Rose Tournament. So much fun that we utterly failed to take any pictures. Here are some pictures of me in my new garb after the fact.

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I finished the last of the eight long flat-felled seams in the car on the way to the event.

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We made it our goal while there to meet new people, since playing in the SCA is much more fun with friends than without, and we made several new friends from all three baronies present.

We also enjoyed playing with our new equipment at the thrown weapons range and archery range (a hatchet for my lord and a recurve bow for me!). Going forward, I plan to practice more regularly with my bow to better my form and thus not require basic instruction every single time I attend an event.

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My wimple was a complete success. Not only did it stay on my head through dancing, archery, and much walking, but it provided useful protection from the sun. My lord is still red about the face and neck thanks to my sieve of a brain (which resulted in a lack of necessaries such as sunscreen and matches–though forgetting matches is a great strategy if you want to force yourself to meet new people).

The only downside to my wimple is the fillet, which proved to be rather itchy. Since this one is made of acrylic yarn anyway, I shall feel no sorrow in speedily replacing it with a linen or silk fillet.

I am so sold on wimples. Mine was comfortable, practical, simple enough to put on without a mirror, never got in the way, and never stabbed anyone with its pins. Besides all that, it looks awesome.

Wimples for the win.

Happy Yarning!

Fun with Freezer Paper

I picked up a new hobby! Freezer paper stenciling. All you need is an iron, some acrylic paint or fabric paint, some freezer paper, a knife, and an idea. There are dozens of great tutorials online.

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I was surprised and delighted by the crisp lines I could achieve. However, I have learned that very thin parts of the stencil got muddled when I blotted on the paint too thickly, as you see with the orange text on the Faster Than Light onesie. Perhaps I can clear up the lettering with white paint and a thin brush.

Seriously though, if you ever want to decorate a t-shirt/bag/onesie/etc., try freezer paper stenciling!

Happy Yarning.

Yarning

Works in progress from my yarning hobbies.

Stripes and checkers baby blanket

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Knit, acrylic, about 60% done. Everyone in the Young Women’s program at church knows I knit because I keep toting this along to activities.

Update: See the finished blanket in a later post. Completed Stripes and Checkers Baby Blanket

Inkle Project #6

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It’s a belt commissioned by my sister. #10 crochet cotton, inkle-woven, with a celtic pickup pattern I derived from the one on norsegirl.com. Incidentally, you too can learn to inkle weave from her website.

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Update: See the finished belt in a later post. Completed Endless Knots Inkle Belt

Green afghan

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Tunisian crochet, wool, just begun. I fell in love with the texture of this variation of Tunisian crochet. It makes a very fluid fabric. Plus, my mother-in-law gifted me a bunch of great green wool.

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And…the Infamous Tree Blanket

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Tapestry crochet, acrylic.

I’ve worked on this sucker on and off since high school. Still only about 70% done. I’m not all that eager to finish, because it just doesn’t look as nice as I hoped. There isn’t enough contrast between the dark colors and the black background, and all those strings I carry along peek out everywhere.

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Still, it forced me to learn to crochet left-handed (to maintain a front and back), so it’s not a total waste?

When the mood strikes me, I also spin.

The project I’m proudest of was a knitted alpaca hat for my dad, with wool from his own alpaca.

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Can you spot the hat? Knitting it was only a small part of this project.

What yarn crafts do you like to do?